2010 Constitutional Amendment Likely

May 23rd, 2009 – Before passing the legislation, the House amended it to greatly narrow its scope. The ability of patients to grow their own medical marijuana was removed, and the bill was narrowed to cover only patients suffering from terminal illnesses.

“I’m disappointed in the governor’s action, but I’m not giving up,” said Rep. Tom Rukavina (DFL-Virginia), sponsor of the House bill. “This would have been the narrowest, strictest medical marijuana law in the country, but the bottom line remains that there are patients suffering terribly who need protection, and I won’t stop till they are protected.”
“For the governor to veto this legislation even after the House narrowed it so much that thousands of suffering patients would have been without protection is just unbelievably cruel,” said Senate bill sponsor Sen. Steve Murphy (DFL-Red Wing). “Since the governor has refused to listen to reason or to the overwhelming majority of Minnesotans, we have no choice but to bypass him and take this directly to the people through a constitutional amendment.”

“The governor thinks I’m a criminal for allowing my daughter some comfort during the last months of her life,” said Joni Whiting of Jordan, whose adult daughter’s suffering was
relieved by medical marijuana while she was undergoing treatment for the melanoma that eventually killed her. “I don’t know how he sleeps at night, but I do know I’m not giving up until others in my daughter’s situation are protected.”

Thirteen states, comprising approximately one-quarter of the U.S. population, now permit medical use of marijuana under state law if a physician has recommended it. Source.

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