Education


Thousands Learn How to Grow Legal Medical Marijuana

November 30, 2009 – Don’t expect to pull an all-nighter at Med Grow Cannabis College.
Michigan’s first training center for medical marijuana education doesn’t ask students for their homework. There are no final exams. “We’re more of a trade school,” said Nick Tennant, Med Grow’s 24-year-old founder.

As states loosen their medical marijuana laws, institutions such as Med Grow are sprouting up, looking to educate potential caregivers about how to enter the cannabis industry the legal way.

Tennant opened the doors of Med Grow’s 4,800-square-foot facility near Detroit in September, about 10 months after voters approved the state’s medical marijuana act.
Always wanting to be his own boss, Tennant had dropped out of college to manage valet and auto-detail companies. But when his businesses contracted under the smothering recession, he looked to the medical marijuana industry for his next opportunity, months before the measure was up for public vote. “We knew the law was going to get passed,” he said.

In addition to Michigan, 12 states have legalized medical marijuana use: Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington.

Tennant fashioned part of his business model after California’s Oaksterdam University, which claims to be the country’s first cannabis college, opening in 2007. Oaksterdam has three campuses in California: Oakland, Los Angeles and North Bay. Spokeswoman Salwa Ibrahim said the institution, which staffs about 50 employees, has graduated about 5,500 students. Oaksterdam welcomes the country’s new crop of cannabis colleges, she said.
“We welcome competition,” she said. “Ultimately, what we’re trying to do is change laws locally and federally.”

Hawaii activist Roger Christie says he connects the high he sustains from marijuana use as a “spiritual” ritual, a practice he believes is legal under First Amendment religion protections. He has been an advocate of marijuana use and legalization for 23 years, he said. Only recently did he add educational outreach to his Hawaii Cannabis Ministry. After reading a news story about a continental cannabis college, he decided to add monthly seminars to his ministry’s repertoire this fall.

So far, he has educated about 60 people over two weekend seminars. A $100 donation covers the cost of classes and a hemp seed lunch. “We train people to grow people to grow the best cannabis humanly possible,” Christie said. Med Grow students cover an array of topics related to the budding industry over semester-long courses or seminars. The curriculum covers proper cultivation and breeding, cooking tips and recipes, how to start a care-giving business and Cannabis History 1010. “Students should feel very confident that they’re going to succeed,” Tennant said.

Medical Marijuana Classes Flourish

Tennant’s school employs 12 people, he said. About 60 students are taking courses during this cycle. Med Grow’s five-week semester program, which offers two tracks convening on Monday or Wednesday nights, costs $475. Unlike accredited academic institutions, there is no standard of practices for cannabis colleges in Michigan. Tennant provides his graduates with a paper certificate anyway. It isn’t required, but a student could use it to establish credibility as a professional caregiver, proving he or she is “not just some Joe Shmoe off the street,” he said.

Graduates of Tennant’s college won’t be leaving their training to set up mass dispensaries. Under Michigan law, state-registered caregivers are only allowed to provide marijuana to a maximum of five patients. In California, students of cannabis colleges have a few more options, Ibrahim said. Students come from out-of-state to become lobbyists, dispensary managers as well as caregivers.

“They can do whatever they want to do,” she said. Trey Daring, 26, moved to Daly City, Calif., after graduating from Old Dominion University, in Virginia, to work as an advocate for the cannabis movement. His favorite course is advanced horticulture — it’s the most useful, he said. He’ll graduate in mid-December. Parents ‘Not Necessarily Proud’ of Cannabis College Certification

Daring’s parents are uneasy about his advocacy of the drug because marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance under federal law, the government’s most restrictive category that also includes LSD, ecstasy and heroin, he said. “I feel like they’re understanding now but not necessarily proud,” he said. His classrooms are not that much different from ones he had in high school and college: dry-erase boards, PowerPoint presentations and knowledgeable instructors. Perhaps the part that’s most different is his classmates.

“There are a lot more people over 30 than probably outsiders would believe,” he said.
Med Grow students also run the demographic gamut. Tennant said his pupils include 18-year-old high school graduates, a 60-year-old pastor and former clients of his old auto-detailing business, some of whom find themselves struggling to keep their own businesses afloat. His instructors stress that their curriculum is for medicinal purposes only, not recreational tips, he said. “I run a very tight operation here,” he said.

The medical marijuana industry could potentially help Michigan’s battered economy, provided it is not abused, Tennant said. Ibrahim of California’s Oaksterdam University also sees cannabis as a way to contribute positively to a state’s economy. Oaksterdam’s Oakland campus recently moved into a 30,000-square-foot building and, she said, the school expects to educate about 1,000 students a month, double the capacity of the previous space. “It really is flourishing in this economy,” she said. “We’re evidence of it. We just moved into a larger facility when everything else seems to be downsizing.”
By Katie Sanders. Source

Advertisements

Horticulturalists, doctors and lawyers among instructors after Michigan legalizes drug as a medicine

November 20, 2009 – It goes without saying that there’s no smoking in class. But there is a good deal of sniffing of leaves, discussion of the finer points of inhaling and debate over which plant gives the biggest hit.

Welcome to Detroit’s cannabis college, recently opened with courses on how to grow marijuana – and harvest, cook and sell it too – after Michigan legalized the drug as a medicine.

Students get instruction from horticulturalists, doctors and lawyers as well as hands-on experience cultivating plants and guidance on how to protect their stash from the criminal element.

“Growing pot by chucking seeds in the garden is fine for the recreational industry,” says the college co-founder, Nick Tennant, whose wholesome and youthful appearance, including acne-covered cheeks, startles some of the more ragged-looking students. “But when we’re using this from a medicinal standpoint, you really need to document your strains and your genetics. The horticultural process is very complex. If you want to do it right you’re going to need to learn. There’s a lot of money in this if you do it right.”

With more than 1,000 medical marijuana certificates issued each month in Michigan for users and growers to sell to them, there is demand for places at MedGrow Cannabis College, located in a small office block.

Among the first students paying $475 for six evening classes are people reliant on marijuana for pain relief and those who help them, including a clergyman who runs an Aids clinic.

Then there are young men such as Ryan Hasbany, a 20-year-old business student. He’s still a year too young to get a grower’s license but he wants to learn the trade. “My father is a family practice doctor and he is issuing medical marijuana cards so I know there are a lot of people getting them. It could turn into a very lucrative business. The street prices are ridiculously high,” he says of medical grade marijuana, which sells at $250 an ounce in Michigan. “There’s Harvard economists who say this is what we need to bring the economy back.”

Hasbany has no hesitation in admitting that he might be in a good position to judge the quality of what he grows. “I smoke it. In my high school graduating class, I’d say 25% of them were smoking it,” he said.

Michigan became the 14th state to legalize medicinal marijuana this year after about two-thirds of voters supported the measure in a referendum. The move reflects growing acceptance of the drug in large parts of the country. In the past week, the US’s first marijuana cafe opened in Oregon and Colorado ordered cannabis sales subject to tax.

The path was carved by California, where permission to buy marijuana requires little more than telling a sympathetic doctor it would make you feel better. Attitudes are changing in Washington too, where the Obama administration has told the FBI and other federal agencies to adhere to state marijuana laws in deciding who to arrest.

For all that, there is still hesitation over identification with what is now a legal industry in Michigan.

The first class of the evening at cannabis college is led by a physician who wants to be known only as Dr Powell. “Don’t mention my first name. It’ll make it harder for them to identify me,” he says.

Powell explains to the students the range of conditions that permit him to issue a medical marijuana certificate, from cancer and Aids to a broad category of severe chronic pain. “If someone’s had back surgery or a gunshot wound,” says Powell.

There are questions. “Can I get it for gout?” asks a student. Powell thinks it unlikely.

The doctor says he is not concerned about addiction but regular cannabis users should find an alternative to smoking. That’s why the course also includes a cookery class with recipes as varied as hash cakes and marijuana sushi.

The horticulture lecturer is even more wary than the doctor about being identified. “They might ask how I know how to grow all this stuff,” he says. “I’ve been doing it for rather longer than it’s been legal.”

He, like many of those who lecture at Cannabis College, is also a consumer because of severe injury in a bad sporting accident. Tennant obtained a medical marijuana certificate to deal with a stomach condition that causes nausea. It is what brought out his acne.

The horticulturalist pulls open a couple of large white doors that act as an entire wall at the front of the classroom. Bright white light streams through the cracks and across the classroom to reveal a den of silver-lined walls, air conditioning ducts, fans and intense lights. At the heart sit a handful of plants – some of them bushes really.

The teacher runs through soil versus hydroponics, lights (red and blue better than LED), pruning (pluck, don’t cut) and the intricacies of cloning. There’s an explanation of ozone generating devices to cover the smell. “You might not want the neighbours to know. You don’t want them raiding your house for your supply,” he says.

Pasted to the wall is a chart of the labyrinth of marijuana species, their effect on different diseases and their particular tastes.

The horticulturist explains that there’s money to be made from the trade in medicinal marijuana but growers must tailor the plant to the customer’s need. “There’s pot that makes you not shut up for five hours. There’s pot where you sit on the couch and drool for five hours. That’s not what you need if you’re going to hold down a job. There’s thousands of people getting patient cards and they all have needs. If you can work out how to meet those individual needs you’re gonna get rich,” he says. Source.